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20130121
20130129
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MSNBCW 7
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
-americans as they marched in selma. >> bill: tom brokaw comparing the gun control debate to civil rights. is that right? we'll debate that. >> tell bill i said hey. >> are you going to come on the show one of these days? >> sure. i have been invited? >> you have. >> bill: jesse watters confronting collin powell at the inaugurations even as the general echos another white house opinion. watters world tonight. >> o'reilly, i have been on a couple of his lists. [ laughter ] >> bill: caution, you where to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. bill o'reilly and liberalism. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. great joy in left wing precincts after president obama's speech yesterday. no longer does the president seek to portray himself as a moderate. he is thought an out-of-the closet liberal. that's no surprise. every american should have realized the president's left wing ideology long before the address. the problem we have in america is not, is not president obama. the problem is us. we, the people. have to d
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
permitted to serve in combat roles and what's next for the u.s. military in term of equal rights and civil rights. the biggest issue is what role the military will have in defending the country at a time when our enemies are fragmented everywhere and it requires very well-educated people and i think the next big thing is in my view is universal service. we're not going to be able to defend the country of ten million people and we're an extremely small force and i don't care what the technology. i believe in universal service. >> a la israel or -- >> oh, yeah. it's going to require some logistical changes and it will require a great deal of leadership, but if you have a situation where you have more people in new york city than you had at pearl harbor and you have an all-volunteer force you're outsourcing our defense for a small number of brave young men and women. that's the next big equal opportunity. >> that's fascinating. kayla, very quickly. you're a published author now and an outspoken advocate. i've got to ask you, political future. are you thinking of running for something, maybe?
progressive vision for the country. civil rights. women's rights. voter rights. gay rights. but some have been trying to say beyonce's performance was the
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
, the virginia republicans have been quite busy this week. on monday during the president's inauguration, civil rights icon in virginia, first african-american mayor of richmond and a state senator decided to attend the president's inauguration. and the republicans in the senate took advantage of his absence on mlk day, as well, to push through a partisan gerrymandered version of the state senate districts. they made all the democratic districts worse and they really targeting deeds the gubernatorial nominee last time ago who represents a rural district and if this new map becomes law, would actually lose his seat because of this. so they're really doing everything they can to sort of game the system in virginia. >> well, you know, i think a couple of things. i think it should be noted that since the beginning of our young nation, democrats have done some things to manipulate the system. >> sure. >> at times, as well. every party, minority, majority, wants to win and they do what they have to to win. not an excuse. just a fact. too, i think some of this is hyperbole. nebraska and maine doing th
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
on to dave, a republican in indiana. caller: hello, c-span. you talk about rights. civil rights, gay rights, and all that. what about the rights of the unborn? don't they have any rights in this country anymore? second, if he is so wanting to come to either do what is right for the country, why does he go outside and do executive orders when he does not get his way? host: we're talking about president obama's second inaugural address. if you missed any part of it yesterday, go to our website c- span.org and watch it there. we covered it throughout the day including the speech, congressional luncheon, and the parade. all of that on c-span.org. gary on twitter says -- host: terry, republican in north carolina. caller: hello, i would like to see obama start his second term off a little bit better. i would like to hold c-span to what they were supposed to do on his first term. quit having the meetings behind closed doors but you guys are supposed to have the cameras in the room. host: we would have cameras in the room if it was allowed. caller: well, you see, that is what he promised last time.
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
close to the public hospital. on the 50th anniversary of the 50th -- on 50 the anniversary of the civil rights act. -- on the anniversary of thcivil rights act. on a closing note, just a report came out that the state about alma -- of alabama has revised -- if you just paid an expert -- if you would just play an exit of the governor. guest: a couple of things he mentioned. one is the challenge that local governments have. when you look ahead, now the state to coming out of the recession, one of the things they are still dealing with our problems at the local level. states often have to step in when local governments have financial problems. in pennsylvania, michigan, rhode island, the problems of local governments are the problems of state officials. host: we have not heard yet from the governor of alabama for the state of state address that will be coming in a couple of weeks. caller: as we all know, big money from a deep pocket contributors really controls the congress in washington. whether it is the republican house or democratic senate. in my opinion it also controls the white hous
and poverty every much as civil rights. but in this speech this president addressed militarism, beautifully, and we believe in enduring security and peace does not mean perpetual war. he spoke about poverty beautifully without ever actually using the word, but talking about we are not a nation of takers, and the fact that he would use the word stone wall and he wasn't referring to a dead general, i was floored. i feel comfortable saying that i think dr. king would have been very proud and impressed with today's speech. >> jennifer: i'm glad to here that. totally agree. we're going to take a break and bring you more analysis of the krer moanny. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or aft
mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the right is my birth mother, and basically i support civil unions. nobody can't ever tell me that i can't have two mothers because i really do. >> this probably would never have happened 10 or 15 years ago, david zirin. you know that. why is it now that athletes are taking more political issues? >> on this issue in particular it's a great example because to me it's the whole real world sports world dynamic and yes, it's definitely true, the real world over here and the sports world over here, but this moat that separates the two, people are starting to build bridges and in the last five years there's been a national movement state by state for lbgt rights and for marriage equality. and athletes, as one athlete said to me, i quote him in the book. he said, look, it's not like we live on planet jock and only come down here to play games and also not like we watch our own msnbc. you know, that's just for athletes. you know, we're part of this world, too, and when you have more and more athletes who have connections to the lbgt community and a mo
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)